[Banner Top] NPC - December, Expires 12/31
Share

February 2013

February 2013

• In for the Long Run
• Equipment Round-up
• New Contenders, Old Favorites
• The First 50 years
• Boom Time
• Don’t Guess with GPS
• ARS Scientists Study Cold-Induced Sweetening
• Dynamic Decade
• Healthier Spuds
Columns
• Taking Stock
• The Guenthner Report
• National Potato Council
• United Potato Growers of America
• United States Potato Board
• Spudman 7

[Banner Middle] Digital Edition

Featured Article

In For the Long Run

In For the Long Run

Any farm that grows both potatoes and tulips can rightly be defined as “diversified.” Iverson Family Farms fits that description by growing bulbs and tubers, along with the rest of their crop portfolio that includes wheat grass seed, green beans, corn and other crops. Actually, the farm is split into two farming operations: there’s Iverson Family Farms and then there’s the Wooden Shoe Tulip Farm. Nels Iverson, his sister Barb and brother, Ken, oversee the farming production aspects of both operations. Barb, with Patti (Nels’ wife) and Janet, sister-in-law of Paul (another Iverson brother) oversee the business side of Wooden Shoe Tulip Farm. The combined farms total between 1,800 and 2,000 acres. Of that acreage, potatoes are a small part of the total farming business these days. For 2012 they planted about 45 acres of the Pike variety for a chipper in California. “My parents bought this farm in 1950,” Nels said. His father, Ross, began growing potatoes in 1962. “I think he was looking for an alternative crop,” Nels said. “We’ve done seed potatoes, chip potatoes, some for the fresh market but we’ve concentrated on chip potatoes.” In years past, potatoes have been a…  » Read more

Featured Article

Taking Stock: Winners and Losers

After weeks of frenzy it appears the world didn’t end and Congress managed to keep from pushing us over the “fiscal cliff.” But appearances can be deceiving and in Congress’s rush to put together a temporary, nine-month extension, of the Farm Bill the Specialty Crop Research Initiative (SCRI) was excluded from the last minute funding. I’m reminded of a line from Bruce Springsteen’s beautiful dirge “Atlantic City,” on his 1982 album “Nebraska”: “Down here it’s just winners and losers, and don’t get caught on the wrong side of that line.” It appears that the potato industry was caught on the wrong side of the line in Congress’s ill-conceived and inept legislative actions. We will continue to monitor and report on future legislative efforts to pass a comprehensive Farm Bill, and hopefully SCRI funding, in the months ahead in Spudman and eSpudman. On a more positive note, I’m proud to announce that Eric Halverson of Black Gold Farms is the recipient of Spudman’s inaugural Emerging Leader Award. Over the course of a relatively short time Eric has proven to be an exceptional and dedicated leader to the potato industry. I have no doubt that he will…  » Read more

Featured Article

The First 50 Years

The First 50 Years

In the fall of 1912 six men met and from that gathering a national organization dedicated to potato research would be born. The group’s intent was simply stated: “to be an effective national potato association…for promoting the potato industry in all its various phases.” From this original gathering, W.A. Martin, of Houlton, Maine, was elected president of this nascent tribal gathering. Martin was given the power to form an organization and select a complement of officers. This would be achieved in January, 1913, when President Martin, with $50 of his personal funds, opened a treasury and stationery was purchased, a vigorous membership campaign inaugurated and a constitution with by-laws was prepared. At the organization’s inaugural meeting in 1914 a motion was put forth for a national organization that would represent the potato industry as a whole. The proceedings of this meeting of 54 members and 13 commercial concerns published a constitution and by-laws, which stated that “this organization shall be known as the National Potato Association of America.” The name would be changed to the Potato Association of America in 1917 as interest spread throughout the continent and across the Atlantic to Europe. Article Two…  » Read more

Featured Article

Equipment Round-Up

Advanced Farm Equipment AFE Lenco recently introduced the Lenco Four-row Wrap Around Harvester with side-hill leveling that keeps the cleaning table level. Lenco has installed a load cell in the primary bed that indicates the amount of dirt being carried, which allows adjusting the speed of the chain so the proper amount of dirt can be carried without adjusting the speed of the machine. The Four-Row Wrap Around Harvester has electronic hydraulics run by an Eaton controller giving the opportunity to dial in to the speed of the primary and the speed of all conveyors and the cleaning table. Another innovation in the Lenco line is the Four Row Pull Type Air Head Harvester with a self-leveling air head and air knife, aka, a big blower out the back of the harvester. For more information visit http://www.lenco-harvesters.com. John Deere John Deere introduces the all-new 2720 Disk Ripper, a heavy-duty primary tillage tool designed to handle a wide variety of tillage tasks. Features of the 2720 Disk Ripper include a new gang design with heavier C-springs, thicker gang tubes and the largest gang bolt in the industry. It uses a disk-ripper-disk configuration to cut, size and…  » Read more

Featured Article

Dynamic Decade

Dynamic Decade

It’s been quite a ride for Rick Miles in the 10 years since he first began supplying fresh Idaho potatoes to Five Guys Burgers and Fries restaurants. In 2002, when Miles’ company was contracted to supply fresh potatoes for french fries, the chain consisted of five stores. Today, there are 1,075 Five Guys restaurants serving their famous burgers with fresh french fries and the chain continues to grow at the rate of more than 200 stores annually and a total of 1,500 franchises in development. “In 2002, they had five franchise stores and our first shipment to them was 150 50-lb. bags of potatoes and that would last them for about 10 days,” Miles said, “We now ship weekly between 50,000 and 60,000 50-lb. bags.” That comes to more than 150 million lbs. of potatoes annually. With the phenomenal rate of growth, Miles recently moved his company, Rick Miles Produce Service, into a new 11,000-square foot warehouse in Idaho Falls from two small offices in Rigby, Idaho. The new three-level building includes office space, a conference room and test kitchen as well as storage space to alleviate the demands on the packing sheds that he…  » Read more

Featured Article

National Potato Council: Federal tax policy threatens family farms

Last December’s “fiscal cliff” debate in Washington, D.C., shed a national spotlight on some of the unique challenges that farmers face in securing their investments in land and production assets for their families. Although individuals and family-run corporations own approximately 98 percent of America’s two million farms and ranches, they are increasingly being lumped together with the much maligned big business sector by those who are searching for more funding to run the federal government. However, the inclusion of inheritance and capital gains taxes in the debate brought to light the fact that our federal tax policy is often at odds with the country’s stated goal of retaining multi-generational family farms within the family.  For example, in order to pass down a family farm after the death of the owner, families must meticulously plan for the estate tax and the financial burden it creates. Under the tax rates put in place during the George W. Bush administration, estate gift taxes were set at a $5 million exemption and a top tax rate of 35 percent. Even at that rate, farmers wishing to transfer their property and business interests to their descendants had to plan ahead…  » Read more

All Articles

In For the Long Run

In For the Long Run

Any farm that grows both potatoes and tulips can rightly be defined as “diversified.” Iverson Family Farms fits that description by growing bulbs and tubers, along with the rest of their crop portfolio that includes wheat grass seed, green beans, corn and other crops. Actually, the farm is split into two farming operations: there’s Iverson Family Farms and then there’s the Wooden Shoe Tulip Farm. Nels Iverson, his sister Barb and brother, Ken, oversee the farming production aspects of both operations. Barb, with Patti (Nels’ wife) and Janet, sister-in-law of Paul (another Iverson brother) oversee the business side of Wooden Shoe Tulip Farm. The combined farms total between 1,800 and 2,000 acres. Of that acreage, potatoes are a small part of the total farming business these days. For 2012 they planted about 45 acres of the Pike variety for a chipper in California. “My parents…  » Read more

Taking Stock: Winners and Losers

After weeks of frenzy it appears the world didn’t end and Congress managed to keep from pushing us over the “fiscal cliff.” But appearances can be deceiving and in Congress’s rush to put together a temporary, nine-month extension, of the Farm Bill the Specialty Crop Research Initiative (SCRI) was excluded from the last minute funding. I’m reminded of a line from Bruce Springsteen’s beautiful dirge “Atlantic City,” on his 1982 album “Nebraska”: “Down here it’s just winners and losers, and don’t get caught on the wrong side of that line.” It appears that the potato industry was caught on the wrong side of the line in Congress’s ill-conceived and inept legislative actions. We will continue to monitor and report on future legislative efforts to pass a comprehensive Farm Bill, and hopefully SCRI funding, in the months ahead in Spudman and eSpudman. On a more positive…  » Read more
The First 50 Years

The First 50 Years

In the fall of 1912 six men met and from that gathering a national organization dedicated to potato research would be born. The group’s intent was simply stated: “to be an effective national potato association…for promoting the potato industry in all its various phases.” From this original gathering, W.A. Martin, of Houlton, Maine, was elected president of this nascent tribal gathering. Martin was given the power to form an organization and select a complement of officers. This would be achieved in January, 1913, when President Martin, with $50 of his personal funds, opened a treasury and stationery was purchased, a vigorous membership campaign inaugurated and a constitution with by-laws was prepared. At the organization’s inaugural meeting in 1914 a motion was put forth for a national organization that would represent the potato industry as a whole. The proceedings of this meeting of 54 members and…  » Read more

Equipment Round-Up

Advanced Farm Equipment AFE Lenco recently introduced the Lenco Four-row Wrap Around Harvester with side-hill leveling that keeps the cleaning table level. Lenco has installed a load cell in the primary bed that indicates the amount of dirt being carried, which allows adjusting the speed of the chain so the proper amount of dirt can be carried without adjusting the speed of the machine. The Four-Row Wrap Around Harvester has electronic hydraulics run by an Eaton controller giving the opportunity to dial in to the speed of the primary and the speed of all conveyors and the cleaning table. Another innovation in the Lenco line is the Four Row Pull Type Air Head Harvester with a self-leveling air head and air knife, aka, a big blower out the back of the harvester. For more information visit http://www.lenco-harvesters.com. John Deere John Deere introduces the all-new 2720…  » Read more
Dynamic Decade

Dynamic Decade

It’s been quite a ride for Rick Miles in the 10 years since he first began supplying fresh Idaho potatoes to Five Guys Burgers and Fries restaurants. In 2002, when Miles’ company was contracted to supply fresh potatoes for french fries, the chain consisted of five stores. Today, there are 1,075 Five Guys restaurants serving their famous burgers with fresh french fries and the chain continues to grow at the rate of more than 200 stores annually and a total of 1,500 franchises in development. “In 2002, they had five franchise stores and our first shipment to them was 150 50-lb. bags of potatoes and that would last them for about 10 days,” Miles said, “We now ship weekly between 50,000 and 60,000 50-lb. bags.” That comes to more than 150 million lbs. of potatoes annually. With the phenomenal rate of growth, Miles recently moved…  » Read more

National Potato Council: Federal tax policy threatens family farms

Last December’s “fiscal cliff” debate in Washington, D.C., shed a national spotlight on some of the unique challenges that farmers face in securing their investments in land and production assets for their families. Although individuals and family-run corporations own approximately 98 percent of America’s two million farms and ranches, they are increasingly being lumped together with the much maligned big business sector by those who are searching for more funding to run the federal government. However, the inclusion of inheritance and capital gains taxes in the debate brought to light the fact that our federal tax policy is often at odds with the country’s stated goal of retaining multi-generational family farms within the family.  For example, in order to pass down a family farm after the death of the owner, families must meticulously plan for the estate tax and the financial burden it creates. Under…  » Read more
[Banner Bottom] House-Media Services - 2014