[Banner Top] KeyBank - November, Expires 11/30
Share

February 2011

February 2011

Features

Departments and Columns

[Banner Middle] NPC - November, Expires 11/30

All Articles

Polar Opposites

Polar Opposites

It's Jan. 11 today, a pleasant, sunny Tuesday, with a balmy temperature of 7˚ F, far different from last week's desert warmth in Las Vegas. Of course most of my time was spent inside the Rio Hotel at the 2011 Potato Expo and the mood at this year's Expo, compared to last year's Expo, was about as different and polar opposites, as the temperatures of Pocatello today and Las Vegas last week. If the general mood of those attending the expo represents the national mood, than I would have to say that everyone, from growers and equipment dealers to the ag chemical producers and the tech support services, are feeling much better in the after-glow of the 2010 season. The industry continues to face myriad issues that won't meekly disappear, and industry leaders are taking the fight to the consumers. Frank van Schaayk, McCain Ltd.…  » Read more
Lessons from the Heartland

Lessons from the Heartland

When you think of Indiana, potatoes aren't the first thing that comes to mind, Basketball, maybe - Larry Bird, Oscar Robertson and John Wooden are all products of the Hoosier state. If you're talking agriculture, then you're talking about corn and soybeans, but potatoes? Not likely. Not Indiana. But there are potato growers in the Hoosier state - including the Vieck family of Vincennes, Ind. Vincennes is the county seat of Knox County, is the oldest city in Indiana and was the site of a major victory during the Revolutionary War in the Northwest territories in 1779 that nearly doubled the size of the original 13 colonies. The Vieck family came over from Germany and began farming in Napoleon, Ohio, before moving to Indiana and settling in Knox County. Viecks have been farming in the Midwest for five or six generations, and have grown potatoes…  » Read more
Precision Agriculture

Precision Agriculture

Farmers' views on precision agriculture can basically be fit into three lines of thought. Some view precision farming as the solution to everything and are completely sold on it. Others are initially reluctant to adopt the newer technologies because of the cost involved, but they take the step anyway because they know it's worth it. And then there are those who simply refuse to use the latest technologies because they either don't believe they're worth the cost or they don't understand them. Bruce Crapo, a grower of 6,000 acres of commercial potatoes and 2,000 acres of seed potatoes in Idaho, is a good example of how the average potato farmer looks at precision agriculture - he uses technology to reduce costs, increase output and improve profits. Crapo isn't thrilled at the cost of high-tech equipment such as GPS-guided tractors, but he knows it's saving him…  » Read more
Spudman 7: Duane Preston

Spudman 7: Duane Preston

Duane Preston, better know as "Sarge," is a Professor Emeritus and retired Extension educator for potatoes with the University of Minnesota. Sarge retired from the University in June 2007 after a 42-year career. He was the Extension agent for potatoes for North Dakota and Minnesota with a joint appointment with University of Minnesota and North Dakota State University extension service for 30 years. He has traveled worldwide presented talks and papers in Canada, Europe, Ukraine, Japan, South Africa, Australia, Italy, Spain and several countries in South America. He was the president of the Potato Association of America and received the prestigious award - "Potato Man for all Seasons" from the National Potato Council and has received numerous other awards from industry, national and international organizations. He has written over 300 articles for books, magazines and reviewed professional publications. Duane and his wife Kay have been…  » Read more
Dakota Trailblazer

Dakota Trailblazer

Dakota Trailblazer (AOND95249-1Russ) Parentage: A98163-3LS x A8914-4 Developers: The North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station and North Dakota StateUniversity Plant Variety Protection: Application in progress Strengths: High yield of uniform tubers; resistance to sugar ends, cold induced sweetening,verticillium wilt, and good field resistance to foliar late blight. Morphological Characteristics Plant: Pretty, vigorous, medium to large vine with white flowers. Vine is erect and has medium-late maturity. Tubers: Attractive tubers with medium dark russet skin and long and blocky tuber type; eyes are shallow and tubers have creamy white flesh.   Agronomic Characteristics Vine Maturity: Medium-late. Tubers: Long and blocky, with medium dark russet skin and creamy white flesh. Sets fewer tubers than Russet Burbank and sizes quickly. Begin monitoring tuber size in northern production areas by Aug. 1. Yield Potential: High and produces a high percentage of U.S. No. 1 tubers. Specific Gravity: High (greater than…  » Read more
[Banner Bottom] House-Digital Edition