[Banner Top] KeyBank - August, Expires 8/31
Share

April 2013

April 2013

Features:

Columns:

  • Taking Stock
  • National Potato Council
  • United Potato Growers of America
  • United States Potato Board

We're happy to provide a sampling of the articles in this issue. To receive full issues of Spudman, please subscribe

[Banner Middle] House-Buyers Guide 2013

Featured Article

Fighting Late Blight

Fighting Late Blight

 Late blight isn’t an annual problem for Wisconsin growers, but it does make a presence in potato fields occasionally. Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-M) have recently seen new strains of the disease developing in the state, prompting them to undertake a comprehensive study to find resistance before it becomes a serious epidemic. Amanda Gevens, UW-Extension potato and vegetable pathologist, is leading a project on pathogen tracking and characterization of late blight. “We had late season detection in 10 counties, but the incidence was very low. So while it was present, we didn’t have a severe problem of late blight across the entire state,” Gevens said about the 2012 growing season. Wisconsin grows about 63,000 acres of potatoes annually, making it the largest value crop in the state. That contrasts with tomatoes, which account for about 4,000 acres. Both crops can influence the disease, Gevens said, and once in the fields, the pathogen can remain active and potentially cause problems for several seasons. “History has shown us when we have late blight problems in one year, it lingers in the system for a subsequent year. It could be in volunteers, cull piles or seed…  » Read more

Featured Article

Meeting the Challenges

Meeting the Challenges

The death of his father revised Carl Hoverson’s plans to become an engineer and brought him home to the family farm. Hoverson’s great-grandparents settled near Manvel, N.D., in 1881. He is a fifth generation farmer, but initially had other aspirations after completing high school in 1973. “I was 20 years-old in January 1976 and in college at the University of North Dakota studying engineering when my dad, Odin died,” Hoverson said. “It was a difficult time, and I suddenly had that life-altering decision of whether to continue with my schooling or to pick up this opportunity to farm. I knew I wouldn’t have another chance at farming ever again, so I decided it was what I should do. I stopped college two years short of my degree. The beginning of Hoverson’s potato production history is both remarkable and reflective of how many farm businesses start small and eventually grow in prominence. In many ways, his history is also reflective of how the potato industry in the Red River Valley has developed over the years. “Initially, I farmed the same crops my dad did, but my uncle and grandfather Clarence grew potatoes, and I always thought…  » Read more

Featured Article

Opportunity Knocks

Opportunity Knocks

Martin Sidor is a third-generation farmer, whose family began growing potatoes in the sandy Eastern Long Island soil in 1908. Sidor has the heavy hands and easy demeanor of a man who’s spent his life working the earth but also realizes that no matter how much he and his wife Carol love growing potatoes on their 170-acre family farm, it’s still a business. Large Midwest farms with newer potato varieties that shipped and stored well were making it more and more challenging to stay in business.  “We realized we had to make a decision. We got into chips to diversify,” Sidor said from the kitchen-table office in his Mattituck, N.Y. farmhouse.  “We know potatoes. Chips are an in-line diversification.”           Before moving to chips, Sidor had tried a few other crops such as cabbage and cauliflower to diversify his offerings but neither could provide the cash the farm needed. He also considered raising tobacco during the 1990’s cigar boon. “Tobacco was grown on Eastern Long Island many years ago and is grown commercially across Long Island Sound in Connecticut,” he said.  “I thought about growing tobacco but decided against it.”            In 2005 they took…  » Read more

Featured Article

Taking Stock-The cruelest month

Taking Stock-The cruelest month

April is the cruelest month. At least that was T.S. Eliot’s assessment and the English poet wasn’t referring to taxes. None the less, I’ve got taxes on my mind as I write this column, but let’s leave that cruel reality behind and talk about something a little more pleasant, the April issue of Spudman. We have a varied and interesting collection of articles this month. Beginning with David Fairbourn’s profile of North Dakota grower Carl Hoverson. Sometimes life throws a wrench into your plans for the future. Such was the case for Carl Hoverson. With the death of his father, a young man’s plans for a career as an engineer were forever changed. Fairbourn’s profile of Hoverson provides us with an understanding of how dedication to hard work results in a successful farming operation. Success doesn’t happen by accident. We continue our series celebrating The Potato Association of America’s centennial anniversary with an article by Joe Guenthner and Phil Nolte. Guenthner and Nolte place the spotlight on two sections in PAA this month, Plant Protection and Utilization & Marketing. These articles represent a great opportunity to read about an important research element within the potato…  » Read more

Featured Article

Training Future Leaders

Training Future Leaders

It wasn’t quite as intense as a boot camp but participants in the 2013 Potato Industry Leadership Institute (PILI) spent seven days immersed in everything about the potato industry. Beginning in Idaho Falls, Idaho, on February 21, the 2013 class spent two and a half days working on leadership training and visiting two packing sheds, a processing plant, a dehy plant and a potato equipment manufacturing plant. Travis Blacker, Idaho Potato Commission’s director of industry relations, and Derek Peterson, an alumnus from the 2012 PILI class and the grower leader for the 2013 class were the hosts and tour leaders during their time in Idaho. Following their time in Idaho the class flew to Washington, D.C., where they spent Sunday in an Iron Chef style cooking competition and then joined fellow members of the potato industry in the NPC Potato D.C. Fly-In. On Monday and Tuesday they participated in two more days of seminars on the potato industry, how Congress works, the current budget crisis and pending federal legislation facing the industry. Finally, the class took to Capitol Hill with their respective state delegations to visit with their Senators and Representatives to lobby for the…  » Read more

All Articles

Meeting the Challenges

Meeting the Challenges

The death of his father revised Carl Hoverson’s plans to become an engineer and brought him home to the family farm. Hoverson’s great-grandparents settled near Manvel, N.D., in 1881. He is a fifth generation farmer, but initially had other aspirations after completing high school in 1973. “I was 20 years-old in January 1976 and in college at the University of North Dakota studying engineering when my dad, Odin died,” Hoverson said. “It was a difficult time, and I suddenly had that life-altering decision of whether to continue with my schooling or to pick up this opportunity to farm. I knew I wouldn’t have another chance at farming ever again, so I decided it was what I should do. I stopped college two years short of my degree. The beginning of Hoverson’s potato production history is both remarkable and reflective of how many farm businesses start…  » Read more
Opportunity Knocks

Opportunity Knocks

Martin Sidor is a third-generation farmer, whose family began growing potatoes in the sandy Eastern Long Island soil in 1908. Sidor has the heavy hands and easy demeanor of a man who’s spent his life working the earth but also realizes that no matter how much he and his wife Carol love growing potatoes on their 170-acre family farm, it’s still a business. Large Midwest farms with newer potato varieties that shipped and stored well were making it more and more challenging to stay in business.  “We realized we had to make a decision. We got into chips to diversify,” Sidor said from the kitchen-table office in his Mattituck, N.Y. farmhouse.  “We know potatoes. Chips are an in-line diversification.”           Before moving to chips, Sidor had tried a few other crops such as cabbage and cauliflower to diversify his offerings but neither could provide the…  » Read more
Taking Stock-The cruelest month

Taking Stock-The cruelest month

April is the cruelest month. At least that was T.S. Eliot’s assessment and the English poet wasn’t referring to taxes. None the less, I’ve got taxes on my mind as I write this column, but let’s leave that cruel reality behind and talk about something a little more pleasant, the April issue of Spudman. We have a varied and interesting collection of articles this month. Beginning with David Fairbourn’s profile of North Dakota grower Carl Hoverson. Sometimes life throws a wrench into your plans for the future. Such was the case for Carl Hoverson. With the death of his father, a young man’s plans for a career as an engineer were forever changed. Fairbourn’s profile of Hoverson provides us with an understanding of how dedication to hard work results in a successful farming operation. Success doesn’t happen by accident. We continue our series celebrating The…  » Read more
Fighting Late Blight

Fighting Late Blight

 Late blight isn’t an annual problem for Wisconsin growers, but it does make a presence in potato fields occasionally. Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-M) have recently seen new strains of the disease developing in the state, prompting them to undertake a comprehensive study to find resistance before it becomes a serious epidemic. Amanda Gevens, UW-Extension potato and vegetable pathologist, is leading a project on pathogen tracking and characterization of late blight. “We had late season detection in 10 counties, but the incidence was very low. So while it was present, we didn’t have a severe problem of late blight across the entire state,” Gevens said about the 2012 growing season. Wisconsin grows about 63,000 acres of potatoes annually, making it the largest value crop in the state. That contrasts with tomatoes, which account for about 4,000 acres. Both crops can influence the disease,…  » Read more
Training Future Leaders

Training Future Leaders

It wasn’t quite as intense as a boot camp but participants in the 2013 Potato Industry Leadership Institute (PILI) spent seven days immersed in everything about the potato industry. Beginning in Idaho Falls, Idaho, on February 21, the 2013 class spent two and a half days working on leadership training and visiting two packing sheds, a processing plant, a dehy plant and a potato equipment manufacturing plant. Travis Blacker, Idaho Potato Commission’s director of industry relations, and Derek Peterson, an alumnus from the 2012 PILI class and the grower leader for the 2013 class were the hosts and tour leaders during their time in Idaho. Following their time in Idaho the class flew to Washington, D.C., where they spent Sunday in an Iron Chef style cooking competition and then joined fellow members of the potato industry in the NPC Potato D.C. Fly-In. On Monday and…  » Read more
[Banner Bottom] House-Media Services - 2014