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May 2006

May 2006
  • Hardy Potato Leadership Randy Hardy is really looking forward to the World Potato Congress.
  • Late Blight Integration of several control tactics is needed to manage potato late blight in sprinkler-irrigated potatoes.
  • Potato Variety Management Institute The three states of the Pacific Northwest have created the Potato Variety Management Institute, an agency that will license, promote and market new potato varieties developed by the cooperative breeding program conducted by the three states' land grant universities.
  • Turning A Profit
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USPB Chairman Looks to Continue Legacy

Randy Hardy is really looking forward to the World Potato Congress. “It’s going to be a good opportunity to show off not just Idaho but the quality of what the United States produces,” said Hardy, of Oakley, Idaho, who was recently elected the chairman of the U.S. Potato Board (USPB). “I don’t think we know right now how neat it will be. I think it’ll be something we’ll be talking about for years.” The World Potato Congress will be Aug. 20-26 in Boise, Idaho. Growers from all over the world will come to the U.S. potato capital to learn about the latest research and see the newest equipment available to them. And, Hardy said, it will be a great time for the U.S. industry to show the world what it’s got. “As we become a global industry, the United States needs to step up to make…  » Read more

Different Practices Can Help Manage Late Blight in Sprinkler-Irrigated Potatoes

Integration of several control tactics is needed to manage potato late blight in sprinkler-irrigated potatoes. These include strict sanitation practices, proper irrigation management, cultural practices and timely applications of fungicides. In storage, temperature, relative humidity, air movement and holding time of tubers need to be managed to reduce any late blight tuber rot. This article lists practices that will help manage late blight in sprinkler-irrigated potato fields in a semiarid environment such as the Columbia Basin or southern Idaho. Sanitation Sanitation practices are aimed at reducing potential sources of infections and include: 1. Plant certified, late blight-free seed tubers 2. Eliminate culls and tuber refuse 3. Manage volunteer potato plants 4. Treat seed with a fungicide containing mancozeb or Curzate 5. Plant seed tubers within 24 hours of cutting Epidemics of late blight characteristically arise from a low level of infected seed tubers, a few infected volunteer plant or from infected tuber refuse.…  » Read more

New Organization Adds Structure to Potato Breeding Efforts

The three states of the Pacific Northwest have created the Potato Variety Management Institute (PVMI), an agency that will license, promote and market new potato varieties developed by the cooperative breeding program conducted by the three states’ land grant universities. The new organization gradually came into existence over the last three years. The three state potato commissions that are partners in the enterprise are still discussing the exact shape and functions of PVMI, said Andy Jensen, director of research for the Washington Potato Commission. Jensen is one of nine board members, along with Bill Brewer, chief executive officer of the Oregon Potato Commission, and Pat Kole, vice president for government and legal affairs for the Idaho Potato Commission. The other six are growers, two from each state: Randy Bauscher and Jack Hoopes from Idaho, Ellie Chervet and Bob Halvorson from Washington, and Jim Carlson and Dan…  » Read more

Turning A Profit

I just read in the North American Potato Market News that Publisher Bruce Huffaker is projecting a 14,400-acre increase in U.S. fall potato production this year – mostly in the Western states. Huffaker also wrote that if Canada follows that path as well, 2006 North American production could increase 18 million cwt., which, he wrote, could reduce grower returns by 34 percent. This is the first season since potato markets in the United States started turning around and giving growers some sort of a profit. Last month, we asked growers if they’ve seen an increase in profits since the United cooperatives formed. Eighty-five percent of respondents said yes. That’s a huge number. In its March 1 potato stocks report, the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service reported there were 8 percent fewer potatoes in storage this year than last year on the same date. In fact, in…  » Read more
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